Beaufortia leveretti is a species of ray-finned fish in the genus Beaufortia. It is native to fast-flowing streams of Red and Pearl River systems in China and Vietnam and to Hainan Island. Its maximum length is 12 cm (4.7 in) but it is usually much smaller

Beaufortia leveretti is a species of ray-finned fish in the genus Beaufortia. It is native to fast-flowing streams of Red and Pearl River systems in China and Vietnam and to Hainan Island. Its maximum length is 12 cm (4.7 in) but it is usually much smaller

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Broadclub cuttlefish - Sepia latimanus. Komodo National Park, 04.05.2014

Broadclub cuttlefish - Sepia latimanus. Komodo National Park, 04.05.2014

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Cyanea capillata gonads 2 by Alexander Semenov on Flickr.
The lion’s mane jellyfish (Cyanea capillata), also known as hair jelly, is the largest known species of jellyfish. Its range is confined to cold, boreal waters of the Arctic, northern Atlantic, and northern Pacific Oceans. Similar jellyfish, which may be the same species, are known to inhabit seas near Australia and New Zealand. The largest recorded specimen found, washed up on the shore of Massachusetts Bay in 1870, had a bell (body) with a diameter of 2.3 metres (7 ft 6 in) and tentacles 37 m (120 ft) long. Lion’s mane jellyfish have been observed below 42°N latitude for some time—specifically in the larger bays of the east coast of the United States. While the lion’s mane jellyfish generally use their stinging tentacles to capture prey, sea anemones can capture their tentacles, which then become tangled, torn apart and consumed. The taxonomy of the Cyanea species is not fully agreed upon; some zoologists have suggested that all species within the genus should be treated as one. Two distinct taxa, however, occur together in at least the eastern North Atlantic, with the blue jellyfish (Cyanea lamarckii Péron & Lesueur, 1810) differing in blue (not red) color and smaller size (10–20 cm diameter, rarely 35 cm). Populations in the western Pacific around Japan are sometimes distinguished as Cyanea nozakii Kisinouye, 1891, or as a race, Cyanea capillata nozakii. Although capable of attaining a bell diameter of over 2 metres (6 ft 7 in), these jellyfish can vary greatly in size; those found in lower latitudes are much smaller than their far northern counterparts with bell about 50 centimetres (20 in) in diameter. The tentacles of larger specimens may trail as long as 30 m (100 ft) or more. These extremely sticky tentacles are grouped into eight clusters, each cluster containing over 100 tentacles, arranged in a series of rows. At 37 m (120 ft) in length, the largest known specimen was longer than a blue whale and is considered one of the longest known animals in the world. This title, however, may be contested: in 1864, a bootlace worm (Lineus longissimus) was found washed up on a Scottish shore that was 55 m (180 ft) long. But because bootlace worms can easily stretch to several times their natural length, it is possible the worm did not actually grow to be that length. The bell is divided into eight lobes. An ostentatiously tangled arrangement of colorful arms emanates from the centre of the bell, much shorter than the silvery, thin tentacles which emanate from the bell’s subumbrella. Size also dictates coloration – larger specimens are a vivid crimson to dark purple while smaller specimens grade to a lighter orange or tan. These jellyfish are named for their showy, trailing tentacles reminiscent of a lion’s mane. (From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

Cyanea capillata gonads 2 by Alexander Semenov on Flickr.

The lion’s mane jellyfish (Cyanea capillata), also known as hair jelly, is the largest known species of jellyfish. Its range is confined to cold, boreal waters of the Arctic, northern Atlantic, and northern Pacific Oceans. Similar jellyfish, which may be the same species, are known to inhabit seas near Australia and New Zealand. The largest recorded specimen found, washed up on the shore of Massachusetts Bay in 1870, had a bell (body) with a diameter of 2.3 metres (7 ft 6 in) and tentacles 37 m (120 ft) long. Lion’s mane jellyfish have been observed below 42°N latitude for some time—specifically in the larger bays of the east coast of the United States.

While the lion’s mane jellyfish generally use their stinging tentacles to capture prey, sea anemones can capture their tentacles, which then become tangled, torn apart and consumed.

The taxonomy of the Cyanea species is not fully agreed upon; some zoologists have suggested that all species within the genus should be treated as one. Two distinct taxa, however, occur together in at least the eastern North Atlantic, with the blue jellyfish (Cyanea lamarckii Péron & Lesueur, 1810) differing in blue (not red) color and smaller size (10–20 cm diameter, rarely 35 cm). Populations in the western Pacific around Japan are sometimes distinguished as Cyanea nozakii Kisinouye, 1891, or as a race, Cyanea capillata nozakii.

Although capable of attaining a bell diameter of over 2 metres (6 ft 7 in), these jellyfish can vary greatly in size; those found in lower latitudes are much smaller than their far northern counterparts with bell about 50 centimetres (20 in) in diameter. The tentacles of larger specimens may trail as long as 30 m (100 ft) or more. These extremely sticky tentacles are grouped into eight clusters, each cluster containing over 100 tentacles, arranged in a series of rows.

At 37 m (120 ft) in length, the largest known specimen was longer than a blue whale and is considered one of the longest known animals in the world. This title, however, may be contested: in 1864, a bootlace worm (Lineus longissimus) was found washed up on a Scottish shore that was 55 m (180 ft) long. But because bootlace worms can easily stretch to several times their natural length, it is possible the worm did not actually grow to be that length.

The bell is divided into eight lobes. An ostentatiously tangled arrangement of colorful arms emanates from the centre of the bell, much shorter than the silvery, thin tentacles which emanate from the bell’s subumbrella.

Size also dictates coloration – larger specimens are a vivid crimson to dark purple while smaller specimens grade to a lighter orange or tan. These jellyfish are named for their showy, trailing tentacles reminiscent of a lion’s mane.

(From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

subadult yellowtail wrasse (Coris gaimard) by Todd Aki on Flickr.
Coris gaimard, the yellowtail wrasse or African coris, among other vernacular names, is a species of wrasse native to the tropical waters of the central Indian Ocean and the western Pacific Ocean, from Christmas Islands and Cocos Keeling Islands to the Society Islands, Hawaii, and from Japan to Australia. It is an inhabitant of coral reefs, being found in areas that offer a mix of sand patches, rubble, and coral at depths from 1 to 50 m (3.3 to 164.0 ft). This species can also be found in the aquarium trade and is popular species for display in public aquaria. This species can reach 40 cm (16 in) in total length, though most do not exceed 20 cm (7.9 in). As a juvenile, it is a bright red colour with large, black-margined white spots. As an adult, it has a pink face and fins, with the exception of the tail fin, which is bright yellow. The body is green towards the anterior darkening and decorated with bright blue specks towards the caudal peduncle. The fish also gains a very bright orange anterior when it grows into adulthood, and has a drastically shaded body in the posterior region that is dotted with obscenely bright blue spots ringed with dark blue. (From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

subadult yellowtail wrasse (Coris gaimard) by Todd Aki on Flickr.

Coris gaimard, the yellowtail wrasse or African coris, among other vernacular names, is a species of wrasse native to the tropical waters of the central Indian Ocean and the western Pacific Ocean, from Christmas Islands and Cocos Keeling Islands to the Society Islands, Hawaii, and from Japan to Australia. It is an inhabitant of coral reefs, being found in areas that offer a mix of sand patches, rubble, and coral at depths from 1 to 50 m (3.3 to 164.0 ft). This species can also be found in the aquarium trade and is popular species for display in public aquaria.

This species can reach 40 cm (16 in) in total length, though most do not exceed 20 cm (7.9 in). As a juvenile, it is a bright red colour with large, black-margined white spots. As an adult, it has a pink face and fins, with the exception of the tail fin, which is bright yellow. The body is green towards the anterior darkening and decorated with bright blue specks towards the caudal peduncle. The fish also gains a very bright orange anterior when it grows into adulthood, and has a drastically shaded body in the posterior region that is dotted with obscenely bright blue spots ringed with dark blue.

(From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

Potter’s angelfish (Centropyge potteri) by Todd Aki on Flickr.
Centropyge potteri, Potter’s angelfish or the russet angelfish, is a marine angelfish from the “Eastern Central Pacific Ocean,” or, more particularly, from the Hawaiian Islands and Johnston Atoll (located to the south of Hawaii). Potter’s angelfish sometimes makes its way into the aquarium trade. It grows to a size of 10 cm (4 in) in length. It is bright orange with irregular, close-set, thin, vertical black stripes on the head and body. The lower part of the body grades to a blueish-black colour. These fish inhabit rocky ledges, feed on algae and detritus and prefer plenty of live rock that they can dart in and out of. This species is essentially hermaphrodite and generally has a dominant male with a harem of females in the wild. This fish is native to the Johnston Atoll and the Hawaiian Islands in the central Pacific Ocean. Its depth range is 10 to 138 m (33 to 453 ft). It is a bentho-pelagic species and its typical habitat is rock, coral and rubble areas of exposed reefs. (From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

Potter’s angelfish (Centropyge potteri) by Todd Aki on Flickr.

Centropyge potteri, Potter’s angelfish or the russet angelfish, is a marine angelfish from the “Eastern Central Pacific Ocean,” or, more particularly, from the Hawaiian Islands and Johnston Atoll (located to the south of Hawaii).
Potter’s angelfish sometimes makes its way into the aquarium trade. It grows to a size of 10 cm (4 in) in length. It is bright orange with irregular, close-set, thin, vertical black stripes on the head and body. The lower part of the body grades to a blueish-black colour. These fish inhabit rocky ledges, feed on algae and detritus and prefer plenty of live rock that they can dart in and out of. This species is essentially hermaphrodite and generally has a dominant male with a harem of females in the wild.
This fish is native to the Johnston Atoll and the Hawaiian Islands in the central Pacific Ocean. Its depth range is 10 to 138 m (33 to 453 ft). It is a bentho-pelagic species and its typical habitat is rock, coral and rubble areas of exposed reefs.

(From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

Congo tetra ( Phenacogrammus interruptus) male

Congo tetra ( Phenacogrammus interruptus) male

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The Regal Rainbowfish  Melanotaenia trifasciata (Rocky Bottom Creek, Goyder River, NT)

The Regal Rainbowfish
Melanotaenia trifasciata (Rocky Bottom Creek, Goyder River, NT)

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